Windsurf Addicts The biggest collection of up to date windsurf news

22Oct/14Off

Kauli Seadi at Teahupoo

Amazing action from Teahupoo.

Click here to read more: continentseven.com

22Oct/14Off

maui surf report 2014-10-22 18:29:00

3.6f@12s. There's some fun peaks and no wind, but the swell dropped a lot.
Forgot to do the morning call: there's waves in lahaina too.

Click here to read more: maui surf report

22Oct/14Off

AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY

AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY

AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY

Nice clip from Scott Mchercher, life involved with Starboard R&D in Windsurf and Stand up paddle boarding. Cross section of sport and life interwoven

Aquatic Biodiversitiy from scott mckercher on Vimeo.

AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY

The post AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

22Oct/14Off

Ricardo Campello smashes the wave ramps of La Torche

Ricardo Campello: nice ramp, huge loop | Photo: PWA/Carter

Ricardo Campello has taken out the PWA La Torche 2014, in Pointe de la Torche, France.

In the last day of the Wave division, winds of 20-30 knots - combined with half-mast to logo high rides - greeted the world's best wave windsurfers. As a result, spectators were able to enjoy sky-high explosive moves.

Campello had Thomas Traversa in the winners' final, and he was chasing his first elimination victory since 2011, in Denmark. Traversa started the heat by looking for a double forward, knowing that he'd need to go big to defeat Campello, but after two failed attempts, he reverted to a big and stylish one-handed backloop.

Click here to read more: Windsurfing News

22Oct/14Off

Gator Tales part #3 – Maui

Severne released the third episode of the Gator tales with Boujmaa Guilloul.

Click here to read more: continentseven.com

22Oct/14Off

Seven Facts about the wave competition at La Torche 2014

What happened on day 4 of the PWA event in La Torche?

Click here to read more: continentseven.com

22Oct/14Off

PWA La Torche – From Above

We are starting to get a bit spoilt by this collection of aerial footage that seems to appear online at each PWA event. Thanks to the power of drones we get to enjoy more and more unique angles. This time, the crew flew their drone in almost 25 knots of wind and actually had to […]

Click here to read more: Boardseeker Windsurfing Magazine

22Oct/14Off

PWA La Torche – Day Four Firing

Need we say more. In case you missed it check out our interview with the winner of the single elimination – Ricardo Campello

Click here to read more: Boardseeker Windsurfing Magazine

22Oct/14Off

AFFAIRS OF THE HART – GOT TO KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON

AFFAIRS OF THE HART - GOT TO KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON

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AFFAIRS OF THE HART – GOT TO KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON


Staying fit is one thing but the more basic concerns for most windsurfers are: is our sport threatening to an aging body? And what can I do prolong my windsurfing life? Harty elicits some expert help to answer 

big questions.  

So how long can you really keep doing this?” is an annual enquiry from my wife who is trying to reconcile the increased financial demands of growing children with the earning power of a husband in his mid 50s who does a sport for a living. I don’t really have an answer but, as I pop another painkiller, I state in all honesty that I feel pretty good and still relish the prospect of a ‘big day.’ Yes I have a wonky knee, but I can’t imagine a time when I won’t windsurf.  Lighter, more efficient kit places a lot less strain on the body, so we can keep on kidding ourselves that we’re getting better and more vital. But are we actually kidding ourselves? Is windsurfing bad for the body and should we all be just a little but more sensible and take up aqua-aerobics?

While I was skiing this year I met a friend of a friend who, given the chance, I would have locked in a room and interrogated for hours. David Boyd, from NZ, has a background in skiing as a competitor, coach, instructor and guide. But for the past 30 years his day job has been in the area of musculoskeletal medicine. His company Foot Science International manufactures medical devices for the orthopaedic market, particularly total joint replacement in the area of hips and knees. And so through his work, he’s frequently working with athletes from a huge range of sports and activities. And joy upon joy, he’s also a keen recreational windsurfer, ever in search of the perfect gybe, so if ever there was someone who understood our sport on a physical level…  First of all, he fitted some of his company’s customized footbeds into my ski boots. Apart from alleviating pressure points, their main purpose is to increase prioperception. The more of your foot you have in contact with the boot, the more messages you receive from the ski. I at once made a gybing parallel. One of the main errors is to gybe too much on the toes. The more foot you have in contact with the board as you bank over, the more information you get. David said he had been experimenting using their foam to make footpads for slalom to give the ultimate foot-to-board contact. But because they mould so well, the problem was getting the feet out.
We digress. How does he view windsurfing and windsurfers from a physical standpoint?

 “There seems to be a lot of old buggers, but there is a relatively low incidence of serious injury from windsurfing. But there is a high incidence of injuries or complaints brought into the sport, which windsurfing may aggravate.”

 So assuming we have reasonable technique, is windsurfing bad for the body; and if so, which bits? 

 “In comparing windsurfing to other sports I don’t think that it is particularly hard on the body. Apart from wear and tear on soft, office hands, it does seem to place particular strain on shoulders and the lower back. The shoulder strain is most likely specific to the sport. Our stance places a particularly narrow range of motion on the shoulder joint. Optimally the shoulder joint requires equal strength in about 5 different directions and windsurfing tends to only occupy about 2 of them. Therefore, the more we do, the more imbalanced our shoulder becomes and the more likelihood there is of an overuse injury. 

With regard the lower back problems. There is no doubt that we do, from time to time, damage our backs specifically during windsurfing. But it’s often because we have a relatively sedentary occupation involving computer hours, and that windsurfing is an aggravator rather than the cause. The same goes for hips and knees.”

 But what about those happy folk without a condition, who want to remain that way? 

“In terms of prevention of injury and chronic conditions, my suggestion would be not to underestimate the benefit of good long-term aerobic fitness – it’s what helps you have enough strength and muscle control when you suddenly really need it. In terms of avoiding those soft tissue/shoulder/lower back injuries I would suggest developing a habit of frequent exercises for improving upper body posture and opening and strengthening the upper thoracic/chest. Since 95% of what we do in life tends to be in front of us, our chest muscles are naturally stronger and we develop a hunched over stance that is exasperated by our increasing use of computers,
tablets and cellphone devices. Yoga is probably the best all round activity to get involved in.

STARING AT IMMORTALITY …
This is the Peter Pan generation, determined to redefine every passing decade. 40 is the new 20 etc. etc. Since the 1980s, the over-50s category of the New York Marathon has grown by 78%. 90-year-olds have completed an Ironman. On my wave course in Tiree last year, ages of the candidates ranged from 19 to 65 and the 65-year-old was the fittest. Is this just a stubborn refusal to lie down, or are these just genetic freaks? Apparently it’s up to you.

Epidemiological studies have stated that from the age of 40 we begin an inevitable shuffle towards frailty losing about 1% a year of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and respiratory efficiency. But that was until they realised that all of the volunteers for the study were inactive. When they stuck their probes into habitual sporting folk, the results were very different. For example, 65-year-old runners were found to have the same motor units in their muscles as 25-year-olds.
So the message seems, quite clear, even if it does feel a bit achy – use it or lose it. And then take a pill.

PH 14th April 2014 #335

 The human skeleton – specifically designed to windsurf.

The post AFFAIRS OF THE HART – GOT TO KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

22Oct/14Off

Interview – 25,000 Flock to Witness Campello Win

On an incredible day for windsurfing, 25,000 people came from far and wide to watch the wave sailors take to the water. With ideal conditions for both jumping and riding, the best in the world charged through competition without fault. The spectators got to witness all the best moves in the current wave sailors repertoire, […]

Click here to read more: Boardseeker Windsurfing Magazine