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8Dec/15Off

SHAUN COOK – THE FIRST TIME

SHAUN COOK - THE FIRST TIME

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SHAUN COOK – THE FIRST TIME

Shaun Cook has made quite a splash in his first season of racing in the BSA. The co-owner of F-Hot fins was pushed into his first ever slalom event at Harwich this year by Dave White and currently leads the amateur rankings using RRD freerace equipment. Amped and hungry for more competition we caught up with Shaun to learn more about his new found passion and talent for racing and experiences as a first timer on the BSA slalom circuit.

Words & Photos Dave White

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WS – How long have you been windsurfing and where did you learn?
SC – I have been windsurfing since I was 12 years old and was taught by my dad Steve Cook and of course Whitey. They taught themselves to windsurf back in the day so sent me to Alton Water to learn the basics; that’s all it took to get hooked. The next day I beach-started and was water-starting by the end of the week. After that I was one of the crew; good job as at a tender age of twelve I needed a lift to the beach. Those days seem like an eternity ago now, though it’s been a fantastic twenty two years on the water!

WS – What sort of gear have you mostly been riding?
SC – That’s changed over the years, firstly it was F2 / Arrows, then Gaastra / Tabou and now it’s all RRD. Guess you can see a pattern emerging, Whitey’s always had a van full of kit and he was never using what I needed due to our difference in size, pretty handy really! Up until a few weeks ago the biggest board I’d been on was a 100l and that was just to pose in front of the camera, which is exactly how I ended up on a Firemove 112 and X-Tra 6.5!

WS – What made you switch over to slalom?
SC – Not too sure really, I’d taken up kitesurfing for the light wind days just to be on the water, at least that’s how it started out. The last few years I’ve only windsurfed when it was too windy for kitesurfing. Big kit felt clumsy and slow to me, so I was surprised when I tried the 6.5, it was like being bitten by the windsurfing bug all over again. Guess it was just good timing as the BSA were coming to Harwich and Whitey gave me a push into entering. I didn’t think it was for me but with my arm well and truly twisted I went and couldn’t believe how much fun it was.

WS – How easy is it to rock up and join a BSA racing event?
SC – Making the decision to go racing was harder than the realities of signing up. Simply turn up and ask for Brian; he’s easy to spot, he’s the one with the wig on. Strangely that helps as you suddenly realize it is not that serious.You enter your details onto the form, pay a little cash and hay presto, you’re not only in but you’ve got windsurf insurance.

There’s three options, well two actually, the Pro fleet naturally took itself out of the equation, Master Blaster or Am’s Slalom. I was opting for the former but that twist in my arm was still there making the decisions (blooming Whitey!), so off I went to the riders briefing. There we had a quick introduction for the day’s event and newcomers were offered an explanation to the starting procedure and it was reassuring that I wasn’t alone; there were a few other first timers also going through the ropes.

“ Having a start and finish line just heightens the enjoyment of windsurfing, racing is a great laugh both on and off the water ”


WS – What sails, boards and masts did you need?
SC – I guess not everyone entering their first ever event will have a personal caddy and a trailer full to the brim with everything from wave to race kit. Yes, it was a role reversal, Whitey was my caddy for the weekend and like every good caddy he was pointing out the best options for the day; right where’s my X-Fire. Apparently not, he pulled out a Firemove and said, ‘sail what you know, not what you can’. That didn’t make sense at first but getting round the course in comfort gained me more places than speed would have done. Outside of your normal windsurfing kit, you’ll need a start watch; nothing complicated but anything that’ll do a three-minute countdown.

WS – How much did it cost?
SC – I entered the Amateur fleet, and it cost about £55 to enter. As I was a new member I think I will earn a 20% discount off my next event. I also joined the UKWA which gives you insurance for the year; this set me back about £45 but I think it is well worth it to be covered.

WS – What is the atmosphere like between the racers in your fleet?
SC – The atmosphere amongst the amateurs was awesome, even though I was a newbie everyone seemed to be friendly and were willing to help each other out (well until they get on the water
that is anyway!).

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WS – What did you learn from your first two events on and off the race course?
SC – Listen to the flag briefing, I was so fixed on the starting sequence I didn’t recognize the abandoned flag as the boat raced past me. The wind had dropped to below racing conditions but I was so amped I continued to cross the line in first place but then to find everyone was waiting at the start for the wind and myself to arrive. To date my most frustrating mistake was at Worthing; this time I really was out in front but mixed up the finishing marks. Simply put, it doesn’t matter how far ahead you are, if you don’t cross the finishing line you just haven’t finished. So learn about flags, race sequences and the rules, there aren’t too many and everything you need to know is online; it’ll take a little heat out of your first competition. Once you’ve signed up, check the heat order and which heats you’ll be in, if you can identify a seasoned regular in your heat, keep an eye on what he’s up to.Though the most important tip of all is, go and
enjoy yourself!

WS – Do the pros help out with any advice or race tips for you?
SC  – It’s probably a question I can’t answer fairly, I’ve not only got Whitey but most of the Pro’s use F-Hot fins which I run with my father Steve. And yes, I know it might seem odd that we make some of the best fins in the world and I haven’t used them, but as Dad says, you don’t see the designers driving the Formula1 cars. That said, I’d still say yes, the beach is just a mix of Pro’s, Am’s and Masterblasters, everyone mixes in and the spirit and atmosphere is pretty relaxed.

WS – Are you hoping to move up to the pro fleet?
SC  – I will see how I fair in the Amateur fleet this season, but Whitey’s already saying we’re doing the Pro’s next year, and yes, I think that means the both of us! Actually it’s more than that, but I better not give his plans away, let’s just say I think there will be quite a few of us going for it next year.

WS – Would you recommend any other wannabe racers to come join in some of the other races?
SC – I would highly recommend any windsurfers that fancy a race to join in, actually, even if you just like blasting with your mates you’re already half way there. Having a start and finish line just heightens the enjoyment of windsurfing, racing is a great laugh both on and off the water and it really helps brush
up your skills as a sailor.

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2Oct/15Off

KEVIN GREENSLADE – ADDICTED TO RACE!

KEVIN GREENSLADE - ADDICTED TO RACE!

BSA2-464

KEVIN GREENSLADE – ADDICTED TO RACE!

Next up in our BSA racer interview series is a one to one with the one and only Kevin Greenslade.

Photos John Carter & Dave White

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Where and when did you learn to sail and why do you love windsurfing?
KG: My first attempt at windsurfing was in Cornwall, It was a while before I went on to learn in Weymouth properly as I struggled to pull the sail out of the water but my Dad then bought me a Kiddie rig and I never looked back after that. I think once you get planning for the first time you’re hooked. For me windsurfing is so pure it takes over the mind whilst you’re on the water, you never stop learning, there are so many different aspects to it, you can continually push yourself. I’ve met some amazing people and travelled to some awesome places and great memories all because of Windsurfing. That’s why I love it 30 years on!

How many years have you been racing on the BSA tour?
KG: I did my first BFA and UKBSA events in 1989 and have raced since then taking a few years out when the Children came along.

How much equipment do you need to be able to compete at one of the BSA events and what do you typically take along?
KG: Due to the way the BSA is structured you can race with as much or as little kit as you want. Master blast you could compete on a beginner board or a wave board. The amatuer fleet you could for sure compete with three sails and one or two boards (not necessarily slalom gear) depending on how seriously you’re taking it. In the Pro fleet I tend to take three Boards (Tabou Mantas) 85, 71 and 61 wide and 6 sails (Gaastra, GA Vapours) 9.6 down to 5.6 and fins are very important I use F-hot 50cm down to 32cm.

How much does a typical event cost?
KG: Entry is quite a bit cheaper if you enter the whole year, but I would say typically £100 pound with entry and fuel most people kip in vans and tents to save on accommodation costs.

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What do you do for a day job?
KG: I work as a Supply chain Engineer for AgustaWestland (Helicopter manufacturers)

Where is your favourite location on tour besides the one closest to home!
KG: I always really enjoy the Worthing events with fun challenging conditions and the new Venue at K66 is awesome for the family.

Are you a very competitive person?
KG:….Oh yes….. I’ve always hated losing (ask my Family about Monopoly), to be fair, so long as I know I’ve done my best I can just about cope if I lose!

What makes a winning racer?
KG: Well you need to be fiercely competitive, I think the best racers are able to stay calm under pressure and like all good boy scouts, be prepared.

Do you ever test and train with any partners?
KG: I’m Fortunate enough to have Ross Williams (when he’s in the UK) and Simon Pettifer to train with. We have spent the last couple of years helping develop the F-hot fins (Weymouth is the perfect testing ground). There is also a really high standard of others who I sail with at home such as Pete Young, Steve Core and up and coming youth Tom Wells. OTC are pinging out lots of Gromit’s who are soon to be hot on our heels Scot, Reed, Sam and James to name a few. The future is bright!! So yes I’m spoilt for training partners.

Can you give us a few tips on how to tune up your slalom equipment?
KG: Bjorn Dunkerbeck once said it doesn’t matter how you rig it as long as you rig it right!! One thing I’ve learned is you can spend as much time looking at your sail on the beech but there is no substitute for taking out on the water and lining up with someone of a similar speed , then make your adjustments and try again. Remember it doesn’t just stop at downhaul and outhaul, you’ve got Boom height, harness line length and position, Clew position, mast track position, fin and even foot strap positions. All these are variables that can be changed to help you go faster or slower. Don’t be afraid to ask others for help!

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How about a few tips for a first timer at a BSA race event?
KG: Be organised have as much kit ready as you can to take the pressure off if you need to make a change. The start is crucial, make sure you’re near the start boat in good time to get your heat. Try and find space on approach to the start and hit the line with as much speed as possible (this takes practice but it is something you can practise on your own). Finally try and stay out of trouble if you crash whether you’re right or wrong the race is over, sail within your own limits don’t try and pull off any miracle moves at the gybe marks. Oh yes and enjoy it!

Any advice for the BSA organizers on how they might encourage more people to turn up at events?
KG: It’s always difficult being at the mercy of the weather, the BSA is constantly evolving and looking for ways to get more people competing. Location is critical and getting local shops/schools to publicise the events and spread the word that you can now come and compete at your first event for just £10.

Best and worst day ever on the BSA tour!
KG: Slalom can be brutal at times probably the worst is losing an event on the last race as a result of the wind dropping that happened at Weymouth last year to me. Best moments I guess winning your first elimination is one of the most memorable, but to be honest any event with good wind lots of racing and sunshine is hard to beat.

Give us three words to describe yourself?
KG: God this feels like a dating website or a job interview  Tall, Dark and Handsome ha ha!…. On the water, competitive, passionate  and determined off the water relaxed, approachable and fun!

The post KEVIN GREENSLADE – ADDICTED TO RACE! appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

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30Sep/15Off

BSA ROUND 6 TENBY 2015 VIDEO

BSA ROUND 6 TENBY 2015 VIDEO

BSA ROUND 6 TENBY 2015 VIDEO

Just in – British Slalom Championships round 6 the penultimate event in Tenby South Wales. Sponsored by Simmer Style and Oshea. Supported by Puravida. Thanks to Pete Davies for the clip!

 

The post BSA ROUND 6 TENBY 2015 VIDEO appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

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28Sep/15Off

BSA TENBY RESULTS & GALLERY

BSA TENBY RESULTS & GALLERY

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Slalom Event 6

This weekend saw Tenby host the round 6 of the BSA Slalom series.

Results and mega photo gallery by Dave White;

Masterblaster Fleet

1st  Josh Hunt
2nd Jonathan Grestrex
3rd Sarah Perkins
4th Pawel Wozniak
5th  Jess Austin
6th Anne Welsh
7th  Karen Dunn

Amateur Fleet
1st Shaun Cook
2nd Kacper Wozniak
3rd James Battye
4th Ruben Lansley
5th Scotty Stallman
6th Jasper Geddes
7th Vasseur Yann
8th Ian Roberts
9th Danny Geereedhary
10th Sarah Jackson
11th Jason Hill
12th Mark Palmer
13thJim Brookes-Dowsett
13th Zara Davis
13th Daniel Connor
13th Alastair Campbell
13th David Strudwick
13th Peter Whitemore
13th Charles Milner
13th Joe Thompson
13th Russ Clark
13th Bob Ingram
13th Garry Connell

Pro Fleet
1st Sam Latham
2ndSimon Pettifer
3rd Michael George
4th James Dinsmore
5th Kevin Greenslade
6th Kieth Atkinson
7th Jason Clarke
8th Adrian Wallis
9th Tim Gibson
9th Leigh Kingaby
9th  Nicky Welsh
9th Jim Crossley

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The post BSA TENBY RESULTS & GALLERY appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

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15Sep/15Off

DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM

DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM

BSA-H-521(1)

DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM

Up and coming North/ Fanatic rider Sam Latham takes the hot seat in our latest series of BSA racer interviews and reveals all about competing on the British tour.

Words JOHN CARTER

 

Where and when did you learn to sail and why do you love windsurfing?
I learnt to windsurf at Aqua Sports, Merstham, Surrey when I was nine. A family friend had started dinghy sailing and asked if I wanted to try windsurfing with him. I did RYA level one and two, but just couldn’t get the hang of it. So I actually gave up and did sailing for a year. After spending some time at the lake I saw someone (who is now one of my best friends and actually my boss) planning around. I knew I had to give it another try, I haven’t looked back. I did the whole RYA pathway, Team 15, Techno and RS:X until I was about to move to the Mens 9.5 fleet. I had always slalom sailed and wave sailed alongside my course racing and enjoying the high wind side of the sport more.

BSA-Worthing-180
How many years have you been racing on the BSA tour?
I think I did my first slalom event on my Techno in 2006, which was a great event, I remember it very clearly, the sand bar was kicking a wave up just by the start line and everyone was launching themselves!

How much equipment do you need to be able to compete at one of the BSA events and what do you typically take along?
A sail and board that can get you planning in 13 knots is key; with a few sails down to a 6.5/7meter. Then I’m sure you will be fine on a large wave board and waves sails in more wind. At a guess for an average weight man on the tour 85/95kg: – 130 later board with a 8.5 – 9.0 and a 100l 7.0 down to your waves sails I’m fortunate enough to be supported by the best shop in the UK, the one and only BOARDWISE and am part of Nik Baker’s K66 Team. Because of this I’m able to have 3 boards and a range of slalom sails, which include:90l, 112 and 120l Fanatic Falcons and 5.2, 5.7, 6.3, 7.0, 7.7 and 8.4 North Warps. If the forecast is looking super hairy, I tend to chuck in my larger wave board and my 3.7, 4.2 and 4.7.

How much does a typical event cost?
I try to do my events as cheaply as possible, by sleeping in my van and making lunch before I go away. The largest expense is obviously fuel and the entrance fee. If you pre-enter the events the UKWA give you a very generous discount, which I believe is 25%. I would say I probably spend approximately £100-£150 an event dependant on location and what I eat.

What do you do for a day job?
I currently work for my good friend Ben Grist, who set up Oakdene Designs. We have a studio in Ockley, Surrey, designing and manufacturing personalised gifts for Not On the High Street. I also have set up my own business, South East Signage. I design, manufacture and fit vehicle graphics, signs, stickers and merchandise.  Including windsurfing sail numbers.

www.southeastsignage.com   www.oakdenedesigns.com

Where is your favourite location on tour besides the one closest to home!
Weymouth always provides good conditions but I do like being in the west-country when we have a Marazion event.

Are there any equipment restrictions at a BSA event?
To be honest I’m not sure, I thought there was a restriction on board width but we have people race on formula boards when its light, so I don’t see that being a problem!

Are you a very competitive person?
I like to think I’m not, but everyone says I am. I think I’m so used to being how I am that I don’t notice it and just enjoy giving it my all. Otherwise what’s the point in training so much!

What makes a winning racer?|
Well it used to be that the heavier guys do the best, weight seems to still be a great help for speed. But it seems the people who are what I call ‘efficient’ weight/strength and of course skill level seem to be getting the top results. There is a hell of a lot to be said for experience and time on the water though! I’m still learning new things every year!

Why choose racing to get your kicks?
Don’t get me wrong, riding big waves or looping is a real buzz! But a similar feeling of fear runs through me when I’m trying to go as fast as possible, in sometimes 35knots, surrounded by 10 other guys squeezing into the first gybe mark. There isn’t a self-given reward like it when you finish one of these types of races in a respectable position.

Do you ever test and train with any partners?
I was training with a few guys, such as Simon Pettifer when I was in Bournemouth, during university. But to be honest there isn’t really any slalom guys that regularly sail at Worthing or Shoreham. I tend to do minimal speed tuning, but instead sail up wind and gybe a crazy amount of times on the way back.

Can you give us a few tips on how to tune up your slalom equipment?
The North and Fanatic gear is pretty simple. Its pretty much right out of the bag. I tend to tighten the battens a little and write on my sail the extension size and clue settings I like the most to make rigging at events easier and with no errors.

BSA-H-378
How about a few tips for a first timer at a BSA race event?
Make sure you’re in the right place at the right time. Understand the heat and timing system and then trust your watch, try not to follow other people as you will always be behind them. It can be a slow and long learning curve so just try to enjoy the experience and your performance will increase over time. Talk to people, the slalom crowd is like a big friendly family, everyone is happy to help each other.

Any advice for the BSA organisers on how they might encourage more people to turn up at events?
Maybe advertise and encourage people doing course racing to join in, especially the younger techno guys as there boards are perfectly suitable to get around the course.

Best and worst day ever on the BSA tour!
I have had a few events where I have lost overall positions because of count backs or discards. That never feels good, when you know you have sail consistently well. I will always remember an event many years ago at Hove, 30knots onshore, mast high shore break, figure of eight course around the half mile fixed boys. On wave boards and 4.2’s and the committee boat was only able to hold ground on the engine. No idea how I did, but it was a mental experience and I was very young back then.

Give us three words to describe yourself?
Dedicated, Ginger and Organised!

The post DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

15Sep/15Off

DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM

DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM

BSA-H-521(1)

DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM

Up and coming North/ Fanatic rider Sam Latham takes the hot seat in our latest series of BSA racer interviews and reveals all about competing on the British tour.

Words JOHN CARTER

 

Where and when did you learn to sail and why do you love windsurfing?
I learnt to windsurf at Aqua Sports, Merstham, Surrey when I was nine. A family friend had started dinghy sailing and asked if I wanted to try windsurfing with him. I did RYA level one and two, but just couldn’t get the hang of it. So I actually gave up and did sailing for a year. After spending some time at the lake I saw someone (who is now one of my best friends and actually my boss) planning around. I knew I had to give it another try, I haven’t looked back. I did the whole RYA pathway, Team 15, Techno and RS:X until I was about to move to the Mens 9.5 fleet. I had always slalom sailed and wave sailed alongside my course racing and enjoying the high wind side of the sport more.

BSA-Worthing-180
How many years have you been racing on the BSA tour?
I think I did my first slalom event on my Techno in 2006, which was a great event, I remember it very clearly, the sand bar was kicking a wave up just by the start line and everyone was launching themselves!

How much equipment do you need to be able to compete at one of the BSA events and what do you typically take along?
A sail and board that can get you planning in 13 knots is key; with a few sails down to a 6.5/7meter. Then I’m sure you will be fine on a large wave board and waves sails in more wind. At a guess for an average weight man on the tour 85/95kg: – 130 later board with a 8.5 – 9.0 and a 100l 7.0 down to your waves sails I’m fortunate enough to be supported by the best shop in the UK, the one and only BOARDWISE and am part of Nik Baker’s K66 Team. Because of this I’m able to have 3 boards and a range of slalom sails, which include:90l, 112 and 120l Fanatic Falcons and 5.2, 5.7, 6.3, 7.0, 7.7 and 8.4 North Warps. If the forecast is looking super hairy, I tend to chuck in my larger wave board and my 3.7, 4.2 and 4.7.

How much does a typical event cost?
I try to do my events as cheaply as possible, by sleeping in my van and making lunch before I go away. The largest expense is obviously fuel and the entrance fee. If you pre-enter the events the UKWA give you a very generous discount, which I believe is 25%. I would say I probably spend approximately £100-£150 an event dependant on location and what I eat.

What do you do for a day job?
I currently work for my good friend Ben Grist, who set up Oakdene Designs. We have a studio in Ockley, Surrey, designing and manufacturing personalised gifts for Not On the High Street. I also have set up my own business, South East Signage. I design, manufacture and fit vehicle graphics, signs, stickers and merchandise.  Including windsurfing sail numbers.

www.southeastsignage.com   www.oakdenedesigns.com

Where is your favourite location on tour besides the one closest to home!
Weymouth always provides good conditions but I do like being in the west-country when we have a Marazion event.

Are there any equipment restrictions at a BSA event?
To be honest I’m not sure, I thought there was a restriction on board width but we have people race on formula boards when its light, so I don’t see that being a problem!

Are you a very competitive person?
I like to think I’m not, but everyone says I am. I think I’m so used to being how I am that I don’t notice it and just enjoy giving it my all. Otherwise what’s the point in training so much!

What makes a winning racer?|
Well it used to be that the heavier guys do the best, weight seems to still be a great help for speed. But it seems the people who are what I call ‘efficient’ weight/strength and of course skill level seem to be getting the top results. There is a hell of a lot to be said for experience and time on the water though! I’m still learning new things every year!

Why choose racing to get your kicks?
Don’t get me wrong, riding big waves or looping is a real buzz! But a similar feeling of fear runs through me when I’m trying to go as fast as possible, in sometimes 35knots, surrounded by 10 other guys squeezing into the first gybe mark. There isn’t a self-given reward like it when you finish one of these types of races in a respectable position.

Do you ever test and train with any partners?
I was training with a few guys, such as Simon Pettifer when I was in Bournemouth, during university. But to be honest there isn’t really any slalom guys that regularly sail at Worthing or Shoreham. I tend to do minimal speed tuning, but instead sail up wind and gybe a crazy amount of times on the way back.

Can you give us a few tips on how to tune up your slalom equipment?
The North and Fanatic gear is pretty simple. Its pretty much right out of the bag. I tend to tighten the battens a little and write on my sail the extension size and clue settings I like the most to make rigging at events easier and with no errors.

BSA-H-378
How about a few tips for a first timer at a BSA race event?
Make sure you’re in the right place at the right time. Understand the heat and timing system and then trust your watch, try not to follow other people as you will always be behind them. It can be a slow and long learning curve so just try to enjoy the experience and your performance will increase over time. Talk to people, the slalom crowd is like a big friendly family, everyone is happy to help each other.

Any advice for the BSA organisers on how they might encourage more people to turn up at events?
Maybe advertise and encourage people doing course racing to join in, especially the younger techno guys as there boards are perfectly suitable to get around the course.

Best and worst day ever on the BSA tour!
I have had a few events where I have lost overall positions because of count backs or discards. That never feels good, when you know you have sail consistently well. I will always remember an event many years ago at Hove, 30knots onshore, mast high shore break, figure of eight course around the half mile fixed boys. On wave boards and 4.2’s and the committee boat was only able to hold ground on the engine. No idea how I did, but it was a mental experience and I was very young back then.

Give us three words to describe yourself?
Dedicated, Ginger and Organised!

The post DESIGNER SUPREME: Q&A WITH SAM LATHAM appeared first on Windsurf Magazine.

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

30Jun/15Off

BSA HUNTSTANTON GALLERY

BSA HUNTSTANTON GALLERY

BSAQuayside-267

The British Slalom Association were at Hunstanton at the weekend. It was a great event with perfect racing conditions on the sunday – check out this gallery of the action by Dave White. Event sponsored by Quayside Windsurfers

Well done to everyone, you put on a great show!

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4Jun/15Off

BSA WORTHING GALLERY & ROUND UP

BSA WORTHING GALLERY & ROUND UP

BSA-Worthing-93

BSA WORTHING GALLERY & ROUND UP

BSA photo gallery pics by Nik Baker and Dave White. Words: Nik Baker

BSA Slalom 4 – Worthing Seafront 30/31 May 2015. There was an awesome turnout for last weekend’s BSA slalom racing hosted by Fanatic/ North on Worthing seafront. Both Saturday and Sunday saw excellent conditions for all fleets. In the men’s pro fleet, with his superb consistency, speed and control in the first race James Dinsmore took off to take the opening bullet and he went on to dominate all six rounds. The remaining podium positions was a battle between Kevin Greenslade and Sam Latham with some great racing from the likes of Tom wells and especially Leigh Kingaby on the windier and more radical day on Sunday, Leigh showed his south coast training really paid off with some top three finishes. The Amateurs was closely fought as usual with some outstanding performances especially considering many of the sailors only usually sail on lakes or in harbours, so to sail on the south coast was a test in itself. The stand out however was a returning windsurfer from Southend dragged down by the ‘Mighty Whitey’ in the name of Shaun Cook who really did outperform himself and came in top spot which was awesome to see. Second and third were Yann Vasseur and Simon Langley who both showed great potential. Normally the south coast is a bit daunting for the Master Blaster fleet but at low tide it was shallow for 500 yards, pretty flat and very manageable so the fleet had a blast. John Lane took the win, with Anne Walsh second and Josh Lane third. Josh also took the Under 17 prize too. Zara Davis competed in the Amateurs and took first women’s prize in her usual graceful style and speed, enjoying the bouncy coast sailing rather than trying to break world speed records for a change. On Saturday evening after a long hard day or racing the competitors sat down to a beer and the usual BBQ set up which is coming a bit of a thing at the K66/ BSA events followed by a Volley ball tournament on the sand courts just behind the Baker Academy. This really was like a scene out of Top Gun… ok maybe not but it was a great fun evening and had the competitors nicely revved set up of the windy Sundays racing. The prizes were supplied by Fanatic/ North which included North Power it’s and awesome Fanatic deck chairs. See you at the next event in in Hunstanton for the Quayside Demo and BSA on the 27-28th of June.

 

 

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14May/14Off

BRITISH SLALOM RD. 2 VIDEO

BRITISH SLALOM RD. 2 VIDEO

BRITISH SLALOM ROUND 2 VIDEO

There were fantastic conditions for the 2nd round of the UKWA slalom hosted at the OTC in Weymouth and sponsored by GA Sails and Tabou.

Check out the action and interviews.

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17Jun/13Off

ANT BAKER reports from the BSA Round #3

Reining UK slalom and speed champion and recent signing to the BPF team Ant Baker K77 reports from the third round of the BSA in the UK hosted by K66 Distribution who are Black Projects Fins UK representatives. “Round 3 of this years British Slalom Association (BSA) was on the sunny south coast of England …

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