Windsurf Addicts The biggest collection of up to date windsurf news

30Sep/14Off

TUSHINGHAM BOLT OUT OF THE BLUE!

TUSHINGHAM BOLT OUT OF THE BLUE!

TUSHINGHAM BOLT  OUT  OF  THE  BLUE!

Since 1977 when Roger Tushingham started up his namesake brand, ‘Tushingham Sails’ have been at the forefront of U.K. windsurfing. The facts speak for themselves. At some point during their time on the water most British sailors have used a Tushingham, while a staggering 70% have actually owned one. Head to any popular beach in the U.K. and most likely you will see one out blasting, as this dynamic home grown brand repeatedly bucks the trends and outsells the bigger known international brands in our domestic market. Amongst the reasons for the brands continuing success, Tushingham have never been afraid to diversify or take bold steps to stay ahead of the pack. In the past the brand has offered an extensive line of designs aimed squarely at the U.K. rider for our conditions. But with the market demands changing drastically, Tushingham are about radically to re shuffle their program by condensing four existing ranges down into one brand new line, ‘The Bolt!’ John Carter investigates …

Words
& Photos JOHN CARTER

(This feature originally appeared in the July 2014 issue of Windsurf Magazine. To read more features like this first, Print and Digital subscriptions are available. Prices include delivery globally for 10 x issues a year!)

STEALTH
A chance phone call to Dave Hackford in early January 2014 unleashed the news that Roger Tushingham was in the midst of a covert mission to the Isle of Wight to check over the finishing touches to their new sail line ‘The Bolt’. I’d already heard a few rumours that they were working on a major secret project, but armed with this latest intel, I jumped in my car and headed straight for Ken Black’s sail loft to check out the evidence first hand. Hidden off the beaten track on a road known to the locals as ‘The Undercliff’, Ken’s house is the perfect stealth HQ to carry out the last tweaks and changes to their new range away from the public eye. As I pull up the drive, Roger and Ken already have several of the very latest prototypes unrolled in the garden and are meticulously checking every detail before the new models can be put into full-scale production.

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

3Apr/14Off

SAM ROSS – CROSS TRAINING

SAM ROSS - CROSS TRAINING

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5-SECOND SHRED

Don’t worry I’m not going to tell you to get on a bike or sup round your nearest island, although both may be a good idea. The windsurfing we want to do isn’t always available to us especially in the summer months. Whilst this is frustrating it does give us time to enjoy the beach or local reservoir in nice weather and presents us with an opportunity to still improve our windsurfing.

The phrase ‘light wind freestyle’ can often get an emotive response from many windsurfers within certain demographics. “I’m too old for that” or ‘”it’s a bit boring”often pop up. “It’s great for your rig and board handling” is the normal reply of an instructor. So which tricks and how should we be doing them to our planing windsurfing more effective?

DON’T MAKE IT TOO EASY
The first thing is picking the right kit. The big-board-small-sail combo is the usual weapon of choice, but might not always be the best. A big board will certainly make cruising around between moves easier and add an element of fun and security, but take a sail that offers some resistance. If I’m going out in non-planing conditions to do light wind freestyle I’ll take the biggest sail I have in my wave freestyle quiver  - a 5.7.

Two reasons for this are that if offers a bit of feedback and resistance in moves so I know if I’m getting it right or wrong, plus it’s the sail I’m likely to go and try moves on when the wind kicks in. It’s all very well taking your 4.2, but it will give you no feedback in light winds and it’s the most unlikely sail in your quiver that you’ll be attempting new moves on when the wind does kick in.

HAVE A STRATEGY
The next thing to do is pick the light wind moves that help you train for the high wind moves. Heli-tacks, sail 360s and sailing front-to-sail are all stalwarts of our light wind routines, but we need to put some productive practice in to get the high wind results later on. So when you’re doing the above, ask yourself why you’ve chosen it? What is your intention – and where is your attention? So a heli-tack might be chosen because it helps with footwork and rig flips. Our intention might be to control it clew first so our attention is on opening the rig off the wind.

By thinking about what we are doing rather than simply flinging a rig around and seeing what we can get away with, we can make the most out of our light wind sessions and reap the benefits when it picks up.

So maximize the warmer weather while you can,  as when the nights start to close in and the temperatures drop, you’ll be glad you put the hours in when you could. SR

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

15Jan/14Off

SAM ROSS – THE WAY OUT

SAM ROSS - THE WAY OUT

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5-SECOND SHRED SERIES

HOW TO EXIT MOVES

(This feature was published in the May 2013 issue of Windsurf Magazine. You can read similar long and short-form technique articles from our coaching gurus hot-off-the-press with a print or digital subscription.)

The exits of moves are always the hardest thing to practice and focus on. Apart from there being no guarantee we’ll even get as far as the exit, but any mental focus we have been able to use during the move is almost completely dried up by the end.

Exiting moves consistently is every sailors  aim, but often comes with caveats that that are all too familiar. “I’m pretty consistent in 5.5 weather” or “ I always stay dry when doing move ‘X’ on flat water. So what simple elements should we be focusing on at the end of a move no matter what the conditions? How can we become more consistent exiting the same manoeuvre on all types of gear, in every location we sail in?

LOOK AND SEE
Let’s examine at the basics. Where we look is always going to be number one. Most exits go wrong when we look at the rig in a hope that we can get hold of it more easily.

So, if we only had one thing to think about, it would be getting the head looking over our leading shoulder and focusing on where we want to go.

The better we are at doing this the more likely we are to have success.

KEEP IT STRAIGHT
If we wanted to add in another layer of focus, it would getting the rig upright and in the right position.

Rather than reaching for the rig, we need it to come back to us.

With the rig back in the sailing position, the board will flatten off and be more  instantly stable.

POWER ON THROUGH
The last thing to focus on is often the most counterintuitive.

When you are about to sail away from a move that you didn’t necessarily expect to,  we often deal with it like a delicate item.

We tiptoe around the exit as if we don’t want to upset the board and rig and think we can sneak out of the move before we fall in.

However, if we consider when we fall in the least it’s normally when we are sailing at full power as we get resistance from the rig.

So when we come to the exit of a move we should be focusing on getting the power back on as soon as we can.

As with many things, a bit of grunt can make up for quite a few faults and, when coupled with the other two areas of focus, this should have us coming out of moves more consistently and quickly.

So we only have three things that we can apply across a range of moves and in almost all conditions, set the head, get the rig upright and get the power back on. 

SR

For more coaching tips watch Sam’s Clips or head over to www.sam-ross.co.uk

 

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

28Nov/13Off

HOW TO CHOP HOP WITH SAM ROSS

HOW TO CHOP HOP WITH SAM ROSS

sam ross how to chop hop clip movie video technique

Introducing the fifth episode of our exclusive video technique-series by renowned U.K. and Tushingham / Starboard UK rider and coach Sam Ross, who outlines the fundamentals of the chop-hop – a gateway move to popping nearly every advanced aeriel trick in the sport.

For details on Sam’s upcoming clinics head over to sam-ross.co.uk

More technique and how-to tips from Sam Ross:

How to Carve Gybe
How to Waterstart
Planing Tack Technique Guide
How to Duck Gybe

Clip by LifeCinematic

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

31Oct/13Off

HOW TO DUCK GYBE WITH SAM ROSS

HOW TO DUCK GYBE WITH SAM ROSS

how to duck gybe jbe tips technique sam ross

Introducing the fourth episode of a new, exclusive video technique-series by renowned U.K. and Tushingham / Starboard UK rider and coach Sam Ross, who explains how to impress onlookers with the duck gybe.

For details on Sam’s upcoming clinics head over to sam-ross.co.uk

Advanced Windsurfing 4.Duck Gybe from Sam Ross on Vimeo.

More technique and how-to tips from Sam Ross:

How to Carve Gybe
How to Waterstart
Planing Tack Technique Guide

Clip by LifeCinematic

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

22Oct/13Off

HOW TO CARVE GYBE WITH SAM ROSS

HOW TO CARVE GYBE WITH SAM ROSS

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Introducing the third episode of a new, exclusive technique series by renowned U.K. and Tushingham / Starboard UK rider coach Sam Ross, who explains how to master the elusive carve gybe.

For details on Sam’s upcoming clinics head over to sam-ross.co.uk

More technique and how-to tips from Sam Ross:

How to Waterstart
Planing Tack Technique Guide

Clip by LifeCinematic

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

4Oct/13Off

HOW TO WATERSTART WITH SAM ROSS

HOW TO WATERSTART WITH SAM ROSS

Sam Ross Waterstart

Introducing the second in a new technique series by renowned U.K.and Tushingham / Starboard UK rider coach Sam Ross, who explains how to conquer the door-opening waterstart. For details on Sam’s upcoming clinics head over to sam-ross.co.uk

Clip by LifeCinematic

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

2Oct/13Off

THE PLANING TACK WITH SAM ROSS

THE PLANING TACK WITH SAM ROSS

Sam Ross Fast Tack

Introducing the first in a new technique series by renowned U.K.and Tushingham / Starboard UK rider coach Sam Ross, who explains how to execute the perfect planing tack. For details on Sam’s upcoming clinics head over to sam-ross.co.uk

Clip by LifeCinematic

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine

1Oct/13Off

The Badger List

Some moves have plenty of online content built for them others have very little, and as an instructor there often isn’t the time to film a good demo for your students which you can share with them to have a look at.

The Badger List was designed to try and remedy much of this by putting together some simple but well shot videos going through key intermediate skills as well as progressing onto more advanced and freestyle moves. Each video aims to use the best angles and not only give voiceover but some key coaching points at the end of each vid.

You don’t need to sit down for hours and watch hours of footage, each video looks at just one move and they are all between 2 and 7 minutes long. They are layer out in a rough linear order but their bit size nature means you can watch them in any order, many windsurfers learn different things at different times depending on location, conditions etc.

Big thanks to Neilson for putting us up and providing their fantastic resort of Ortakent for the back drop of all the filming, Tushingham Sails and Starboard Windsurfing for all the great gear and Lifecinematic who looked after all the filming editing and production.

If you are keen to train as an instructor or come on a UK or overseas coaching clinic or just want access to more videos check out www.sam-ross.co.uk

Click here to read more: Tushingham

22Aug/13Off

5-SECOND SHRED | THE NEED FOR SPEED

5-SECOND SHRED | THE NEED FOR SPEED

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SAM ROSS’

QUICK TIPS FOR IMPROVING, WHATEVER YOUR LEVEL

The recent smashing of long-standing speed barriers in the Namibian desert is an incredible windsurfing feat that we can all relate too. That fast-moving sensation is the thing that first grabs us about windsurfing, whether it’s gliding along those initial few metres or trying to notch up a couple more clicks on the GPS.  

With speedsailing back under the full glare of media attention I’m sure Christmas stockings will have been bulging full of GPS units and shiny boards and rigs raring to go and emulate our own version of the Luderitz records. But rather than trying to use our cheque book alone, let’s have a look at what we can do on our current kit to make squeeze out a few vital extra knots.

FOOTSTRAPS
If we want to go out with the aim of beating our top speed then we need to state that intention through the size and placement of our straps. No matter how much rig power you can hang onto, it counts for nothing unless you’re driving it into the board’s forward motion. Digging through the heels and curling up the toes in large straps won’t keep the board flat and just adds to slowing the board down. Straps that are very inboard will also mean you put more weight on your back foot as you sheet in and therefore reduce drive through the front foot. Instead, set your straps a little smaller so you’re always driving the board – and make sure there are 4 of them. Outboard equals faster, as long as it feels comfortable.

TUNING
We always hear about speed sailors obsessively tuning their gear. So how do make a start ourselves? Downhaul, outhaul and boom height will be the main variants, but also mastfoot position and fin size can reap big benefits. Downhaul and outhaul will have the biggest instant impact. Downhaul allows us to maintain a stable sail through gusts and outhaul to achieve maximum power off the wind. Make sure your sail is well downhauled so that you don’t sheet out during gusts. For outhaul tuning, off the wind, keep letting it off until you find the point where the sail starts to feel uncomfortable and then put a little back on. The best way to tune is to step-by-step find the limits and then adjust it back a little into the sweet spot.

FROM THE DRIVING SEAT
With your kit well set-up and tuned, extra speed will come as much from putting yourself in the right place at the right time rather than pure technique alone.
So, if we want to go faster, we need to do two things, pre-empt rather than react and sail on the fastest point of sailing. We need to be looking ahead to be able to alter our stance appropriately for the gusts and lulls so that board speed’s maintained all the time. Even on a narrow canal, the fastest way from A-to-B won’t be a straight line. We need to head-up a little in the lulls and bear-off in the gusts to achieve that optimum GPS score. Reaching back and forward all day won’t deliver that extra knot.
So three simple things, set your straps so you mean business, make sure your rig is giving the most it can and don’t sail in straight lines so you can hunt the gusts down and bear-off with the turbos blasting!  SR

For more tricks and tips head over to www.sam-ross.co.uk

Click here to read more: Windsurf Magazine